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If we would just look, there are plenty of answers to be found.

    

Eternal questions abound:  WHO we are, WHERE we are? HOW did we get here? When did it all begin… and WHY?

From the beginning of time humans have searched for answers regarding:

  • Reincarnation
  • Life after life
  • Ghosts
  • What happens when we sleep?
  • The interpretation of dreams
  • Memories of past lives and multiple life experiences
  • Do you feel the crushing suffering of humanity? ~ Of all beings?
  • Space
  • Time
  • Planets
  • The Sun
  • Ever expanding Universe/Multiverses
  • Nature
  • Our abilities beyond the 5 senses
  • Philosophy
  • Science
  • Religion(s)
  • Metaphysics
  • The Cosmos
  • Life on other planets/Dimensions
  • The Astral Plane

Etc… Etc… ETC…

The more we study, the more we realise how very little we actually know.

Yet, we have been given invaluable valuable wisdom, through countless sages through the ages as well as timeless, treasured texts. Upon the discovery of some of these writings a few years ago, I felt compelled to do something, anything I could to help get them up off of the dusty shelves and into the digital world so that they could be easily accessible, cost nothing and be available for all. I began by voicing the texts into audio books… and now share videos, blogs, memes, quotes, links of the studies and experience acquired through the personal application of these teachings here on Yogi Theosophy.

Again, the word “Yogi” simply means student or aspirant, this channel, website and other Yogi Theosophy social media outlets is not for sharing a different branch of Theosophy… but rather Theosophy in its purest form, to the best of my knowledge and present understanding, these are the teachings themselves.

It is imperative for all of us to remember,

“The platform that the ancient wisdoms are to be taught from ~ are meant for the teachings, not the teacher.”

“Theosophy is the inner life in every religion. It is no new religion, but as old as truth itself… to bring men and women together as co-workers for a great and universal purpose; and the first step toward that end is to accentuate the fact that man is divine, and that to help create a universal brother-hood, based on the Divinity of Man and the Immortality of the Soul, is the duty of every human being.”

~ Katherine Tingley

There seems to be no better time than right now to simply sit down and begin with “The Key to Theosophy” ~ a link to a free PDF copy and other helpful links are listed below.

The Key To Theosophy

PREFACE

“The purpose of this book is exactly expressed in its title, “THE KEY TO THEOSOPHY,” and needs but few words of explanation. It is not a complete or exhaustive text-book of Theosophy, but only a key to unlock the door that leads to the deeper study. It traces the broad outlines of the Wisdom Religion, and explains its fundamental principles; meeting, at the same time, the various objections raised by the average Western enquirer, and endeavouring to present unfamiliar concepts in a form as simple and in language as clear as possible. That it should succeed in making Theosophy intelligible without mental effort on the part of the reader, would be too much to expect; but it is hoped that the obscurity still left is of the thought not of the language, is due to depth not to confusion. To the mentally lazy or obtuse, Theosophy must remain a riddle; for in the world mental as in the world spiritual each man must progress by his own efforts. The writer cannot do the reader’s thinking for him, nor would the latter be any the better off if such vicarious thought were possible. The need for such an exposition as the present has long been felt among those interested in the Theosophical Society and its work, and it is hoped that it will supply information, as free as possible from technicalities, to many whose attention has been awakened, but who, as yet, are merely puzzled and not convinced.

Some care has been taken in disentangling some part of what is true from what is false in Spiritualistic teachings as to the post-mortem life, and to showing the true nature of Spiritualistic phenomena. Previous explanations of a similar kind have drawn much wrath upon the writer’s devoted head; the Spiritualists, like too many others, preferring to believe what is pleasant rather than what is true, and becoming very angry with anyone who destroys an agreeable delusion. For the past year Theosophy has been the target for every poisoned arrow of Spiritualism, as though the possessors of a half truth felt more antagonism to the possessors of the whole truth than those who had no share to boast of.

Very hearty thanks are due from the author to many Theosophists who have sent suggestions and questions, or have otherwise contributed help during the writing of this book. The work will be the more useful for their aid, and that will be their best reward.

— H. P. B.

ENQUIRER. Theosophy and its doctrines are often referred to as a new-fangled religion. Is it a religion?

THEOSOPHIST. It is not. Theosophy is Divine Knowledge or Science.

ENQUIRER. What is the real meaning of the term?

THEOSOPHIST. “Divine Wisdom,” (Theosophia) or Wisdom of the gods, as (theogonia), genealogy of the gods. The word theos means a god in Greek, one of the divine beings, certainly not “God” in the sense attached in our day to the term. Therefore, it is not “Wisdom of God,” as translated by some, but Divine Wisdom such as that possessed by the gods. The term is many thousand years old.

ENQUIRER. What is the origin of the name?

THEOSOPHIST. It comes to us from the Alexandrian philosophers, called lovers of truth, Philaletheians, from phil “loving,” and aletheia “truth.” The name Theosophy dates from the third century of our era, and began with Ammonius Saccas and his disciples (*footnote 1 below), who started the Eclectic Theosophical system.

ENQUIRER. What was the object of this system?

THEOSOPHIST. First of all to inculcate certain great moral truths upon its disciples, and all those who were “lovers of the truth.” Hence the motto adopted by the Theosophical Society: “There is no religion higher than truth.” (X Footnote 2 below)  The chief aim of the Founders of the Eclectic Theosophical School was one of the three objects of its modern successor, the Theosophical Society, namely, to reconcile all religions, sects and nations under a common system of ethics, based on eternal verities.”

The Key to Theosophy – Original (PDF)

(The Secret Doctrine) From the stand-point of science and that of occultism.

Understanding the Logos/

The Voice of the Silence – Free copy

Regarding the first object of Theosophy:

1) To form a nucleus (heart) of the Universal Brotherhood of Humanity, without distinction of race, creed, sex, caste or colour.”

“It is the knowledge of this occult doctrine that found expression in the review of “The Idyll of the White Lotus,” when Mr. T. Subba Row wrote: “. . . every class of adepts has its own bond of spiritual communion which knits them together. . . . . The only possible and effectual way of entering into such brotherhood . . . . is by bringing oneself within the influence of the Spiritual light which radiates from ones own Logos.”

~ The Secret Doctrine

*(Logos comes from Greek – which means: Word/Voice/Speech – The Divine within)

 

  1. * Also called Analogeticists. As explained by Prof. Alex. Wilder, F. T. S., in his “Eclectic Philosophy,” they were called so because of their practice of interpreting all sacred legends and narratives, myths and mysteries, by a rule or principle of analogy and correspondence: so that events which were related as having occurred in the external world were regarded as expressing operations and experiences of the human soul. They were also denominated Neo-Platonists. Though Theosophy, or the Eclectic Theosophical system, is generally attributed to the third century, yet, if Diogenes Laertius is to be credited, its origin is much earlier, as he attributed the system to an Egyptian priest, Pot-Amun, who lived in the early days of the Ptolemaic dynasty. The same author tells us that the name is Coptic, and signifies one consecrated to Amun, the God of Wisdom. Theosophy is the equivalent of Brahm-Vidya, divine knowledge.
  2. X – Eclectic Theosophy was divided under three heads: (1) Belief in one absolute, incomprehensible and supreme Deity, or infinite essence, which is the root of all nature, and of all that is, visible and invisible. (2) Belief in man’s eternal immortal nature, because, being a radiation of the Universal Soul, it is of an identical essence with it. (3) Theurgy, or “divine work,” or producing a work of gods; from theoi, “gods,” and ergein, “to work.” The term is very old, but, as it belongs to the vocabulary of the MYSTERIES, was not in popular use. It was a mystic belief — practically proven by initiated adepts and priests — that, by making oneself as pure as the incorporeal beings — i.e., by returning to one’s pristine purity of nature — man could move the gods to impart to him Divine mysteries, and even cause them to become occasionally visible, either subjectively or objectively. It was the transcendental aspect of what is now called Spiritualism; but having been abused and misconceived by the populace, it had come to be regarded by some as necromancy, and was generally forbidden. A travestied practice of the theurgy of Iamblichus lingers still in the ceremonial magic of some modern Kabalists. Modern Theosophy avoids and rejects both these kinds of magic and “necromancy” as being very dangerous. Real divine theurgy requires an almost superhuman purity and holiness of life; otherwise it degenerates into mediumship or black magic. The immediate disciples of Ammonius Saccas, who was called Theodidaktos, “god-taught” — such as Plotinus and his follower Porphyry — rejected theurgy at first, but were finally reconciled to it through Iamblichus, who wrote a work to that effect entitled De Mysteriis, under the name of his own master, a famous Egyptian priest called Abammon. Ammonius Saccas was the son of Christian parents, and, having been repelled by dogmatic spiritualistic Christianity from his childhood, became a Neo-Platonist, and like J. Boehme and other great seers and mystics, is said to have had divine wisdom revealed to him in dreams and visions. Hence his name of Theodidaktos. He resolved to reconcile every system of religion, and by demonstrating their identical origin to establish one universal creed based on ethics. His life was so blameless and pure, his learning so profound and vast, that several Church Fathers were his secret disciples. Clemens Alexandrinus speaks very highly of him. Plotinus, the “St. John” of Ammonius, was also a man universally respected and esteemed, and of the most profound learning and integrity. When thirty-nine years of age he accompanied the Roman Emperor Gordian and his army to the East, to be instructed by the sages of Bactria and India. He had a School of Philosophy in Rome. Porphyry, his disciple, whose real name was Malek (a Hellenized Jew), collected all the writings of his master. Porphyry was himself a great author, and gave an allegorical interpretation to some parts of Homer’s writings. The system of meditation the Philaletheians resorted to was ecstacy, a system akin to Indian Yoga practice. What is known of the Eclectic School is due to Origen, Longinus, and Plotinus, the immediate disciples of Ammonius — (Vide A. Wilder, op.cit.)